All posts by Glenn Holland

BMR Staff/Contributor I enjoy building steam locomotives and streamliners. You can check out my work on the following sites: Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPuieIdMz4TwY1ard1bCzw

PFx Brick Returns!

The PFx Brick is back on Kickstarter!

After an unfortunate end to the previous Kickstarter campaign, the PFx Brick is back, and they’re already more than halfway there! The new goal is $50,000. The new model has bluetooth compatibility for use on devices, and is also easily customizable from the computer program. As before, the brick supports light, sound, and motor controls with ease, with a WIDE range of options and cool features. The new Kickstarter campaign also has a wider selection of backer rewards.

Long story short, the community gave their opinions, and the PFx guys listened.

Hopefully you’ll consider supporting the campaign!

**IMPORTANT** Announcement Regarding Boxcar Premium Instructions

The staff at Brick Model Railroader has an important announcement regarding the premium instructions set to be released for sale today, April 21, 2017.

We have encountered an unforeseen problem regarding the ball bearings used in the freight car trucks. Essentially, the metal Lego axles that would sit in the bearings are too large to be installed properly without ruining the bearing. Therefore, we are not able to install bearing in the Technic bricks either.

The BMR staff does not want to deliver a product that we feel does not meet our quality standards, and we also do not want to deliver a product that is not what we said we would deliver. We would like to humbly ask the Lego train community for more time until practical and workable solution is achieved.

We apologize for any inconvenience this causes and we apologize for not being able to launch the premium instructions today.

We appreciate the continued support of the community, and we hope we haven’t let anyone down.

 

Cale Leiphart and Glenn Holland

Brick Model Railroader Staff

Brick Model Railroader is live on YouTube!

With Philly Brickfest 2017 almost upon us, one of the goals I had for BMR before then was to get our YouTube channel up and running, and here we are. Presenting the new Brick Model Railroader YouTube Channel! You can find the link on the “Follow BMR” page as well.

It is still a work in progress. There’s work I need to do to get everything connected properly and running smoothly. But, as of noon today, we already have a video posted for your viewing pleasure with a second (and maybe third) on the way.  As time permits, I plan to upload some videos to the BMR channel featuring shows where trains are displayed at, reviews of our premium instructions, and hopefully more.

Just two days now to Philly Brickfest 2017, and hopefully there will be a video covering all the great train action there too. Be sure to subscribe to the channel so you’ll never miss a video from us, and stay tuned for more!

PFx Brick Train Integration Demo

Fx Bricks has been busy uploading some videos to their YouTube channel recently.

In the interest of us train fans, they have posted a two-part video demonstration showing how the PFx brick can be integrated into a stock locomotive.

Part one shows the physical installation of the control system in the locomotive…

Continue reading PFx Brick Train Integration Demo

Details Regarding the Boxcar Premium Instructions

We have been getting a lot of positive comments and seeing a lot of excitement about the coming release of our first run of “premium instructions.” We feel that we now have all the important details in place, so we would like to clarify some of the questions we have been receiving in a little more detail.

Box cover for the boxcar premium instructions. Final design may vary.

Continue reading Details Regarding the Boxcar Premium Instructions

Curved Track – What’s available, and what to Expect

I was recently contacted by a newer member of the LEGO Train community asking for information on the various types of curve tracks used in PennLUG. My response was a lengthy email, which has been adapted to fit an article format, and will be the content of this article.

Before I begin, I should briefly touch on some of the standards for LEGO track configurations. More information can be found on Michael Gale’s L-Gauge.org. Standard spacing practices for most layouts (including my own PennLUG) use a 16-stud spacing between the centerlines of two parallel tracks. There are two main reasons for this standard. One, it was set by LEGO, when they produced the 9-volt switch tracks. Using a turnout, a return curve, and an extra length of straight track, you get two even and parallel tracks. Two, this yields a convenient way to build track: two lines evenly spaced on one baseplate.

Two parallel tracks and a standard LEGO turnout demonstrating the 16 stud centerline distance.
Every LEGO train enthusiast has probably, at some point, owned a loop of standard LEGO track. Any number of straight sections closed off by the small curve tracks you’d find in any 9-volt of Power Functions set. These tracks are known as “R40”,  as they have a radius of 40 studs.

Continue reading Curved Track – What’s available, and what to Expect

Glenn Holland: The Rebuilder

This past week, I watched an episode of James May: The Reassembler. In the opening episode of season two, May walks through the reassembly of his first ever toy train set, a Hornby Flying Scotsman with realistic chuffing sound, which he received one year as a Christmas gift. Quite ironically, a week before, I had begun exactly the same endeavor, rebuilding my first ever LEGO train set.

https://cdn.globalauctionplatform.com

The 9-volt era had several diamond sets: the Metroliner and Santa Fe Super Chief among them. There were also several oddball sets, with no real prototype counterpart. Set 4561 Railway Express, which I received on Christmas morning around the year 2001, was one such set. But this didn’t stop me from enjoying the set. I built it with the aid of my father and we watched it run around the simple oval track for hours, loading and unloading the wagons countless times. Then, after I got bored of the set, I tore it apart and begun making my first rudimentary train MOCs.

Continue reading Glenn Holland: The Rebuilder

3D-Printed Steam Driver Wheels from Nate Brill

Nate Brill of PennLUG has been very busy recently. Rather than go on about his work, I’ll let him tell you himself:

“Several members of my club have discussed the need/desire for larger and different sized train wheels, and the possibility of 3d printing them. Earlier this year, I was down with a back injury for a while, so I used the time to figure out some 3d design fundamentals and make my own. I don’t have any 3d printing equipment so I put them on shapeways for my own use.

I have had a couple requests for these since word got out that I made them, so I set up a shapeways store:

www.shapeways.com/shops/shupp-s-brick-train-stuff

Here are some sample images:

 

I have made XXL sized (the next size up from Ben Fleskes’ XL sized), a size between medium and large, and a medium diameter train wheel i.e. not a steam driver, just a thin train wheel but with a larger diameter.

These are being offered at cost (I make no money) because I cannot guarantee the fit of the pin and axle holes and other aspects of the production which are out of my control, nor can I make any easy changes that would solve the problem. Anyway, I hope they work for anyone who tries them. Feel free to let me know.”

New driver sizes are always welcome and much appreciated in the community. Head to Nate’s Shapeways shop if you want to get a set of some sweet wheels!